Author Archives: Reflections Recovery Center

Oxymorphone (Opana) Addiction Withdrawal, Treatment for Detox and Rehab

Oxymorphone, marketed under the brand name Opana, is not the first drug that comes to mind when we think about the American opioid epidemic. However, Opana addiction remains a serious concern among addiction treatment specialists around the globe.

Treating an addiction to oxymorphone requires many of the same techniques used in treating addiction to other opioids. But because oxymorphone is such a powerful opiate, extra care should be taken during the recovery process to ensure long-term sobriety.                                                        

What Is Oxymorphone?

German scientists first developed oxymorphone in 1914, but the drug didn’t make it to the American market until 1959. Oxymorphone is prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain, and many patients take it to treat feelings of anxiety prior to surgery.

Like other opioid painkillers, oxymorphone works by binding to opioid receptors throughout the body, which triggers the release of the “feel good” neurotransmitter dopamine. Oxymorphone is an estimated 10 times more powerful than morphine and available in both instant-release and extended-release forms.

Oxymorphone made headlines in 2017 when the FDA issued a request for the drug to be pulled from the U.S. market. This was the first such request in FDA history. By July of that same year, Endo International agreed to pull the extended-release version of Opana from the market, although generic versions of the drug are still available to this day.

Opana Addiction

Like other opioid drugs, oxymorphone has a high potential for abuse. Tolerance to the painkilling effects of oxymorphone develops rapidly with regular use. Over time, users will require more and more of the drug to treat their pain symptoms. Increasing the dose in this way frequently leads to dependence and abuse.

Signs that an oxymorphone user has developed an addiction to the drug include:

  • Drug-seeking behaviors such as “doctor shopping” and illegally purchasing the drug
  • Withdrawing from social activities that the user once enjoyed
  • Constricted or “pinpoint” pupils
  • Dramatic changes in mood that appear out of character
  • Engaging in risk-taking behaviors, such as driving under the influence
  • Trouble staying awake or falling asleep at inappropriate times

Oxymorphone Withdrawal Symptoms

What Is Medically Assisted Detox?

Many opioid addicts find that the process of detoxification is too difficult to handle alone. Instead, they should enter a medically assisted detox program to safely break their drug dependence. Medically assisted detox is a treatment program that incorporates medical supervision and potential pharmaceutical intervention in order to alleviate the unpleasant symptoms of withdrawal.

Benefits of Medically Assisted Oxymorphone Detox

The greatest benefit of medically assisted oxymorphone detox is safety. By going through the detox process with medical supervision, patients can receive immediate treatment for any troubling complications that arise related to the onset of withdrawal symptoms.

While few opioid withdrawal cases result in life-threatening symptoms, detoxing in a medical setting can help to put the patient’s mind and body at ease, which makes a profound difference in the early stages of recovery.

Other benefits of medically assisted Opana detox include:

  • Reduced intensity of opioid withdrawal symptoms
  • Residence in a stable, controlled environment
  • Additional support for any co-occurring disorders
  • Reduced opioid cravings during withdrawal
  • Reduced risk of stress-induced trauma during withdrawal
  • Mitigated risk of early relapse
  • Increased likelihood of long-term recovery

Individuals seeking to overcome an addiction to opioid drugs should take every possible precaution during the withdrawal and detox stages of rehabilitation. At Reflections Recovery Center, our expert staff of addiction treatment specialists have the knowledge and experience to successfully guide male clients through this trying time.  

Rehab for Oxymorphone Addiction

There are a number of factors to consider when choosing a prescription opioid rehab program. Helping clients who suffer from an addiction to oxymorphone isn’t as simple as getting them to stop taking the drug.

Once clean, clients may still need to find a solution for managing their chronic pain. Having a licensed physician present at the prescription drug rehab facility is one way to ensure that preexisting medical conditions receive attention as well. 

It is also important that patients receive emotional counseling to aid in the process of reintegrating back into society. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), psychoeducation and motivational interviewing are all powerful tools that every recovering addict can benefit from during recovery.

Addiction affects everyone in the user’s life. It is important to choose a rehabilitation program that will work with both friends and family to ensure that the recovering addict has a strong support system at home to aid in the healing process.

Prescription Opioid Rehab at Reflections

If you or a man in your life is struggling with an addiction to prescription opioid medications, know that the team of addiction specialists at Reflections Recovery Center in Prescott, Arizona is here to help. Contact us today and take the first step toward a life free from addiction.

Learn How We Can Help You Manage Chronic Pain as You Recover from Addiction

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Benzodiazepine Prescription Drugs that Require Detox

Benzodiazepine Prescription Medications Can Lead to Addiction

Doctors prescribe benzodiazepine medications to treat medical conditions such as panic disorders, muscle spasms, seizures, anxiety disorders and the symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal. While benzodiazepine medications are not as chemically addictive as opioids, cocaine or methamphetamine, they still carry a significant potential for abuse.

Some people abuse benzodiazepine medications for a euphoric high or intense muscle relaxation, and several take these medications longer than advisable. Unfortunately, proper cessation of benzodiazepine medication can be tricky, and attempting to try quitting “cold turkey” can have deadly consequences.

Benzodiazepine Prescription Uses and Risks

People who take benzodiazepine medications for anxiety or other mental health disorders may build a tolerance to the drugs over time. They also develop a physical dependence at the same time, often compelling a cycle of abuse that leads to addiction.

Prolonged use of benzodiazepines will lead to ineffective treatment for the person’s prior symptoms and make it difficult to function at home, school or work. Some people will take these medications in hazardous situations, such as before driving or operating dangerous equipment.

When an individual reaches the point that a benzodiazepine prescription drug is interfering with daily life or has grown into an addiction, it’s crucial to know how to address this issue safely.

Stopping Benzodiazepine Prescriptions Safely

Most doctors will recommend a patient to take a benzodiazepine medication for a certain amount of time and then gradually decrease the dose to wean off the medication. People who improperly stop taking their benzodiazepine medications risk an intense resurgence of previous symptoms the prescription aimed to treat.

Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

Benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms typically include nausea, disorientation, anxiety, hallucinations, hypersensitivity, tremors, and heightened autonomic activities like heart rate and breathing. The most serious possible withdrawal symptom is a potentially fatal grand mal seizure.

When a person enters detox for benzos, medical professionals will administer medications to manage these symptoms and flush the remaining benzos from the patient’s system. This is a long process that involves slowly tapering off the dosage of benzodiazepines that can last weeks or even months, depending on the level of addiction.

Most detox personnel recommend tapering the patient’s previously abused benzodiazepine medication and then switching him or her to a longer-acting benzodiazepine. Then, the patient will slowly taper off of that medication until the physical benzo dependency has passed. During this time, treatment and counseling between doses can help the patient understand the root cause of his or her addiction.

Types of Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepine medications are available in a variety of brands, each of which has different properties. Some are fast acting but only last for a short time, while others are slower acting but last much longer.

Different benzodiazepine medications require different detox methods, so it’s vital to understand the risks of each type of benzodiazepine medication.

Xanax Addiction

Alprazolam, commonly known as Xanax, is an effective treatment for a variety of panic and anxiety disorders. This fast-acting medication reduces excitability and increases inhibitory brain activity.

Xanax addiction can easily lead to:

  • Difficulty functioning in work, school or social settings
  • Profound symptoms of anxiety and panic
  • Disorientation
  • Many other negative symptoms

Chlordiazepoxide: Librium Addiction

Chlordiazepoxide, also known as Librium, is a sedative used to treat anxiety disorders and the withdrawal symptoms of addiction to some other substances, such as alcohol. Librium produces extreme adverse effects when combined with some other substances such as alcohol and opioid-based prescription painkillers.

When abused, Librium can cause “paradoxical disinhibition,” a condition entailing symptoms that one wouldn’t typically expect to see from a person under the influence of a sedative, such as:

  • Increased aggression
  • Irritability
  • Impulsivity

Clonazepam: Klonopin Addiction

Clonazepam, known as Klonopin, is the third-most prescribed benzodiazepine medication in the United States. This drug treats various anxiety disorders such as:

  • Social anxiety disorder
  • Panic disorder
  • Generalized anxiety disorder
  • Extreme phobias

Klonopin abuse can lead to difficulty focusing, memory problems, cravings for more Klonopin, lethargy and delirium. It is possible to overdose on Klonopin, which can lead to respiratory depression, coma or death.

Clorazepate: Tranxene Addiction

Clorazepate, or Tranxene, is a fast-acting benzodiazepine medication that treats several anxiety disorders. Abuse of this drug can lead to dependence, and like other benzodiazepine medications, it requires a careful discontinuation plan for safe cessation.

Diazepam: Valium Addiction

Diazepam, commonly called Valium, is a central nervous system depressant used to treat anxiety and aid relaxation. Valium can ease muscle spasms, prevent seizures and manage the symptoms of various anxiety disorders. Abuse of Valium can lead to tolerance and addiction.

Over time, Valium withdrawal can affect a person’s mental health and cause symptoms such as:

  • Heightened aggression
  • Irritability
  • Hallucinations
  • Feelings of intense anxiety

A Valium overdose can lead to coma or death.

Estazolam: Prosom Addiction

Estazolam, or Prosom, is a short-term prescription to aid sleep. Unfortunately, this drug can lead to dependency when abused, mixed with other substances or taken longer than prescribed.

Flurazepam: Dalmane Addiction

Flurazepam, known as Dalmane, is very similar to Valium and often prescribed as a sleep aid. Similar to Valium, abuse of this drug can easily lead to dependency and significant withdrawal symptoms.

Lorazepam: Ativan Addiction

Doctors generally only prescribe lorazepam, also known as Ativan, for short-term treatment for anxiety disorders. Even if a patient takes this drug as prescribed, it can still lead to tolerance and dependency, which can entail:

  • Profound memory loss
  • Impaired muscle coordination
  • Sensory problems

Midazolam: Versed Addiction

Doctors prescribe midazolam most often as an anesthetic sedative, but it can also help relieve the symptoms of anxiety disorders. Like any other benzodiazepine medication, users should gradually taper off this medication to avoid withdrawal.

Oxazepam: Serax Addiction

Oxazepam, also known as Serax, is a slow-acting benzodiazepine medication that helps users fall asleep and stay asleep. However, slow-release medication can lead to a tolerance, which can then lead to dependency without a cessation plan.

Temazepam: Restoril Addiction

Restoril, or the generic version temazepam, is a sleep aid intended for short-term use. Temazepam can cause short-term memory loss and other withdrawal symptoms with extended or inappropriate use.

Triazolam: Halcion Addiction

Similar to Restoril, Halcion is a sleep aid intended for short-term use. This drug carries a high potential for abuse, and abusing Halcion can lead to significant withdrawal symptoms.

Quazepam: Doral Addiction

Another benzodiazepine sleep aid is quazepam, also known as Doral. This medication depresses the central nervous system and is easily habit forming. Doctors generally only recommend Doral for occasional use.

Undergoing Safe Detox for Benzos

The thought of entering benzodiazepine detox can be frightening, but it’s important to understand how crucial medical assistance is during recovery. Benzodiazepine withdrawal can lead to profound physical and psychological symptoms, so attempting to quit a benzodiazepine medication cold turkey can be extremely dangerous, even fatal.

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Working Through Self-Guilt and Shame During Recovery from Addiction

Guilt can tear you up inside. It is a demon that some people fight for the rest of their lives.

Guilt will creep up in your life, wrapping around and strangling you, leaving you drained and crippled emotionally.

For those fighting addiction, guilt is just another layer on top of a struggle that is big enough on its own.

Appropriate and Inappropriate Guilt

It’s normal and appropriate to feel guilt when you have done something wrong. If you have harmed someone, done something that violates your personal moral or religious values, or have done something you swore you’d never do again, guilt is the appropriate response.

In fact, if you didn’t feel guilty for wrongdoings, it would be a sign of psychopathy. Antisocial personality disorder is characterized by no guilt or remorse for bad behavior.

Antisocial Personality Disorder:
A mental condition in which a person consistently violates and exploits other people’s feelings and rights, shows no regard for right and wrong conduct and has no remorse or guilt for wrong actions.

Guilt is not necessarily a destructive emotion when experienced for the right reasons; however, when it becomes an all-consuming emotion, it will impede your healing and recovery from addiction.

It’s a Shame

Shame can be just as debilitating as guilt. Shame is a powerful feeling that often arises from guilt. However, it can be experienced independent of guilt. If someone bullies you or pressures you into feeling inferior because of what you did or what someone else did, that is shaming.

If you have an external locus of control — you blame outside forces for the events of your life — you will take to heart what others tell you about yourself and can easily be guilted or shamed.

Shame can produce numerous negative feelings in a person. Here are a few examples of what someone dealing with shame might feel:

  • Inferiority
  • Humiliation
  • Remorse
  • Embarrassment
  • Inadequacy
  • Unworthiness

Feeling ashamed is not helpful in recovery, since it can hold a person back in achieving happiness and personal growth. Any focus on negative thinking about yourself reduces self-esteem and inhibits positive change.

Guilt vs. Shame

Shame and Guilt in Addiction Recovery

Nearly everyone that enters rehab believes they won’t have to worry about encountering these feelings of shame, guilt and remorse. However, during detox and the initial phases of treatment, it is very common to suddenly experience an onset of these emotions.

Much like depression and anxiety, guilt and shame seem to come out of nowhere and are two of the biggest psychological symptoms of withdrawal an individual will face during the first six months of recovery.

Self-Punishment Inhibits Recovery

Instead of motivating you to change and be a healthier person, dwelling on the self-tormenting emotions of addiction shame and guilt propel you into a pattern of negative thinking. Living in those feelings of worthlessness causes depression, which can cause relapse.

Oftentimes, negative feelings make people want to turn to drugs or alcohol. Feeling bad about yourself and struggling with depression and anxiety are common triggers for starting or relapsing into an addiction.

Punishing yourself by focusing on the mistakes you’ve made or the negative beliefs someone else has about you only hurts you. It does no good for anyone else, even someone you know you’ve hurt.

Overcoming Feelings of Guilt and Shame

Addiction shame and guilt occur in nearly every single case of substance abuse and alcoholism. As people enter rehab and become and remain sober and clean, they realize the damage they’ve done to themselves and their loved ones. It’s natural for this process to bring up negative feelings.

The key to overcoming this darkness is to learn new addiction coping skills and be able to work through your feelings, creating something positive instead.

Behavioral Therapy in Addiction Treatment 

Behavioral Therapy: 
A set of psychotherapies using techniques based on behaviorism, the belief that all behaviors are learned and can be changed.

The behavior therapies used at Reflections Recovery Center can help men struggling with negative feelings like guilt and shame. The foundation of behavioral therapy is to eradicate irrational thinking and replace it with rational thinking.

When a client at Reflections Recovery Center can open up to a trusted counselor and find camaraderie with his peers, who have an intimate understanding of what he’s going through, great relief and healing occurs.

The amazing therapeutic work in drug and alcohol addiction treatment addresses the negative feelings of guilt and shame, and it helps individuals understand their feelings and let go of resentments so true recovery can begin.

Here are just a few behavioral points on how to cope with shame and guilt when you’re dealing with addiction and trauma:

Feel Your Feelings

Forgive Yourself

Examine Your Guilt

Forgiveness 

One roadblock that keeps us holding onto shame is a lack of forgiveness. When we cannot forgive ourselves and others, we fixate on the pain and judgment instead of releasing ourselves and our loved ones from the merciless grip of guilt.

When you forgive someone, you let the pain of his or her wrongdoings go. It doesn’t mean you condone their behavior. It does mean you are willing to let their mistakes go because you don’t want that hurt to eat you up inside.

Forgiving the people in your life that have wronged you helps you heal. Perhaps you need to make amends for things you’ve done wrong to them as well; and, if so, making amends can be cathartic.

But maybe the pain you hold onto can’t be healed by amends because that person is no longer with us or because re-establishing a relationship with them would be more destructive to your life. In those cases, writing a letter you may or may not send can aid in forgiveness.

People in recovery often confess that forgiving themselves is harder than forgiving someone else. Oftentimes, we are our worst critics. So, being able to treat ourselves kindly and compassionately can be just as much of a virtue as forgiving other people.

Progressing into Self-Worth 

The opposite of shame is self-worth. Valuing, believing in and loving yourself comprise a healthy self-image and increase your self-esteem.

These are some qualities of high self-worth:

  • Confidence
  • Inherent sense of value as a person
  • Independence from external approval
  • Self-respect
  • Self-esteem

Feeling proud of and appreciating yourself increases well-being. There will always be people who will judge and criticize you, and there will be people to praise and encourage you. But learning to see yourself realistically, knowing your own strengths and weaknesses, and being proud of the traits you possess bring you to your own sense of self-worth.

Don’t let shame or guilt hold you back from getting the tools you need to recover. You need healthy addiction coping mechanisms to help you work through emotional issues like guilt, remorse and shame for a successful recovery.

“Each new day is an opportunity to start all over again…
to cleanse our minds and hearts anew and to clarify our vision.
And let us not clutter up today with the leavings of other days.”
– Author unknown, compiled by Jo Petty

Learn Even More About Overcoming Guilt and Shame in the First Year of Sobriety 

How to Let Go of Shame in Recovery

Alcohol Treatment Centers: What Treatment Types Do Alcoholics Need in Rehab?

All alcohol rehabilitation programs are not created equal. Finding a rehab center with the most effective types of treatment can make the difference between relapse and lifelong recovery.

Below, we’ll take a closer look at some of the best alcohol treatment options for achieving a life of sobriety.

Medically Supervised Alcohol Detox

Patients going through alcohol detox are at risk for a number of potentially dangerous side effects. The symptoms of alcohol withdrawal typically begin six hours after the last drink, and include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Fever
  • Heart palpitations
  • Headaches
  • Seizures
  • Delirium tremens (DTs)

These symptoms, and the anxiety that they produce, can make the already difficult process of recovery even harder. Detoxing from alcoholism in a facility with around-the-clock medical supervision ensures that these symptoms are promptly treated.

Medical supervision also helps put the patient’s mind at ease, allowing them to focus on overcoming acute withdrawal and starting their recovery. 

Effective Therapies for Alcoholism Treatment

There are many best practices when it comes to helping alcoholics put down the booze for good. Most of the top alcoholism treatment centers use a mix of clinical and holistic therapies.

Here are five of the top treatment modalities you should look for in a worthwhile alcohol addiction rehab program:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing

Access to Trauma-Informed Addiction Therapy

Nutritional Therapy

Alcohol Treatment Centers: Intensive Outpatient Treatment

Not everyone can afford to put their lives on hold while working toward sobriety. But for many, programs like Alcoholics Anonymous are just not enough. Intensive outpatient treatment may be the best option for men at this point in their recovery.

A quality outpatient treatment program will include many, if not all, of the services offered to inpatient clients. Intensive outpatient treatment is a reasonable option for those with a stable living situation and strong emotional support system at home. 

At Reflections, men who graduate our inpatient program can move to this level of care afterward (if their family leaves nearby or if they stay in a sober living home). Some of our clients actually start out at this level of treatment if they already live in the area and if their addiction isn’t severe enough to warrant 24-hour supervision in an inpatient environment.

Rehab Aftercare Program for Alcoholism

Making the transition back into society after rehab is no easy feat. A robust aftercare program can make the difference between relapse and lifelong recovery. In Reflections’ aftercare program, we teach men the skills they’ll need to navigate the challenges of everyday life while remaining alcohol-free.

After graduating from our alcohol rehabilitation program, our alumni are offered a number of services for alcoholism relapse prevention, including:

  • Housing and job placement services
  • Weekly monitored urine analysis
  • Recreational activities with fellow alumni and current clients
  • Twice-weekly group counseling sessions

Sober Housing Options

Alcoholism Treatment at Reflections

Reflections’ men-only alcoholism treatment center utilizes the most effective treatments designed to set our clients on a path toward lifelong sobriety. If you or your loved one is seeking to overcome an addiction to alcohol, know that help is just a phone call away.

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Addiction and Suicide Rates Soaring in Arizona Cities

Drug addiction and mental health problems go hand in hand like the circle of love and marriage. We use drugs to numb pain, physical or emotional, real or imagined, and because we have mental health problems. And we sometimes have mental health problems because we use too many drugs.

Arizona has had a growing problem of both drug addiction and mental health crises. Phoenix and her suburbs have been particularly hard hit, especially Gilbert, AZ, which has been the center of opioid and heroin addiction in the state for more than 10 years.

Arizona’s Growing Mental Health Crisis 

Depression is a serious mental health problem. It can be fatal.

In 2015, suicide took more than 44,000 lives in America, making self-murder a significant health issue that affects people of all ages, races and ethnicities. In Arizona, suicide is such a severe issue it is ranked as the eighth-leading cause of death, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data.

According to statistics taken from CDC and Arizona Department of Health Services reports, the numbers around this deadly condition in Arizona are shocking:

  • Arizona had 10 child suicides (ages 14 and under) in 2015.
  • Arizona had 60 teen suicides (ages 15 to 19) in 2015.
  • The state had 1,276 suicides overall in 2015.
  • Suicide is the leading cause of death for those aged 10 to 14.
  • Taking one’s own life is the second-leading cause of death for Arizonans aged 15 to 34.
  • There are 2.5 times more deaths from suicide annually than homicide.
  • For each successful suicide attempt, there are 25 failed attempts — with many leading to hospitalization.
  • More women than men have suicidal thoughts and attempts.
  • More men than women are likely to die by suicide.

Arizona Suicide Rates Have Tripled

From 2001 to 2011, the suicide rates in Arizona have soared.

Of note is the suburb of Gilbert, near Phoenix. According to the Health Status Report for Cities and Towns in Maricopa County, the suicide rate increased threefold during the decade. In 2011, there were 31 suicides; in 2000, there were only 7, according to the Maricopa County Department of Public Health. The ratios per capita have increased as well.

The Gilbert Police Department has said it receives an average of four suicide threats or attempts each week, and one suicide completion per week. Mercy Gilbert Medical Center reports the number of mental health consultations rising over the past several years, some of which are related to suicide attempts.

Youth Suicides in Arizona

Last summer, a cluster of teen suicides rocked the community of Gilbert. Six teenagers hanged themselves, and a seventh fell victim to suicide by shooting oneself. Tragically, these young people, unknown to each other, lived less than 12 miles apart from each other. All committed suicide within a six-week period.

Subsequently, Gilbert Public Schools underwent Suicide Alertness Training to help educators recognize students who need help and to connect them with the appropriate resources.

Teen suicide prevention includes:

  • Improved communication between parents and teens.
  • Keeping a close watch on teens’ cellphones.
  • When depression is present, asking outright whether the student plans to kill himself/herself.
  • Monitoring social media.
  • Removing guns, belts and other potential means of self-destruction from the home.
  • Watching for drug or alcohol use.
  • Watching for teens talking about dying or death.
  • Being wary of teens becoming impulsive or taking unnecessary risks.

However, it’s not just the youth in Gilbert that are dying from suicide; it affects people of all ages. Friends and family may think their loved one is just depressed, but depression can become such a severe mental health crisis that suicide seems like a rational solution at the time.

Suicide Risk Factors

Lack of Access to Mental Health Treatment in Arizona

Heroin and Prescription Drug Addiction Arizona on the Rise 

Last year, President Trump declared that America was in the throes of a national public health emergency because of what opioids are doing to our citizens. Arizona is no exception. An American crisis, an Arizonan crisis, opioids and heroin have taken over our streets.

Derived from the age-old poppy plant, opioids are synthetic and organic drugs made from opium. One of the strongest and most addictive of these drugs is heroin, commonly snorted or liquefied and then injected. People caught up in the Gilbert, AZ heroin epidemic just call it dope.

Prescription drug addiction in Arizona is often a result of opioid use. Examples of commonly prescribed opioids are:

  • Percocet
  • Oxycodone/OxyContin
  • Methadone
  • Hydrocodone/Norco
  • Vicodin
  • Fentanyl

In the current opioid epidemic, these medications are easily ill gotten. Whether it be from a relative’s medicine cabinet or through illicit means, prescription drug addiction is rampant across the country and in Arizona.

Opioid Deaths Skyrocketing

New reports are showing a surge in opioid overdose deaths in Arizona. In fact, 2016 marked the highest number of deaths in 10 years. Heroin and prescription opioid painkillers are to blame.

People are starting out by taking painkillers for a legitimate reason, then getting hooked and moving on to something stronger. Accidentally taking too much opioid medication causes cessation of breathing and death.

According to the Arizona Department of Health Services in 2016, the following statistics alarmed state officials:

  • Heroin deaths have tripled since 2012.
  • Every day, two Arizonans die from an opioid overdose.
  • The heroin death rate is rising faster than that of prescription opioids.
  • Hospitals saw more than 51,000 opioid-related encounters.

Because prescription opioid deaths are soaring and the government is cracking down on doctors who prescribe too much Vicodin, Percocet and OxyContin, it’s no surprise people are turning to heroin for relief.

Drug Rehab near Gilbert, AZ

Because of the growing problem of heroin arrests, drug addiction and mental health crises in the Phoenix area, many are seeking out drug rehabs all over Arizona.

The city of Gilbert has seen heroin, a cheaper and more accessible alternative to prescription painkillers, cause an increase in narcotic-related arrests by 300 percent in the past 10 years. Regardless of the changing prescribing guidelines set forth by the government, when people are addicted, they find a way to get the drug they crave.

Treatment centers in Arizona are helping people who are addicted to heroin. The first seven to 10 days going without heroin is excruciating without medical help. Thus, professional drug rehab facilities wean people off opioids and keeps them as comfortable as possible.

If you or your son needs help with a mental health or substance abuse problem in Arizona, call Reflections Recovery Center while there is still time. Many of our clients have dealt with both a mental health issue like depression and a substance use disorder like heroin addiction. We have caring professionals waiting to help.

The Arizona families who have had to deal with these problems are in the thoughts of the team at Reflections Recovery Center in Prescott, AZ. For those facing thoughts of suicide, the situation can feel hopeless. However, depression is a treatable illness. There is help available.

See the Reflections Recovery Experience

Prescription Drugs that May Require Intervention, Rehab and Addiction Treatment

Doctors can prescribe hundreds of different medications for various medical conditions, and some drugs are riskier than others when it comes to addiction. Prescription drugs that regulate behavior, aid sleep, or allay the symptoms of psychological disorders all carry a significant potential for abuse. It’s crucial to understand the risks that come with some of the most commonly seen prescriptions in the country.    

Types of Dangerous Prescription Drugs

Many prescription medications carry a significant risk of addiction. Rehab for prescription drug abuse is available for those who need it, and anyone who may be starting a new medication should investigate the risks of addiction.

Lyrica

Lyrica is an anti-seizure medication. Although it is a Schedule V controlled substance, doctors often prescribe Lyrica to people suffering from:

  • Diabetes
  • Various seizure disorders
  • Fibromyalgia

These medical conditions are very debilitating, so Lyrica quickly grew to astronomical popularity shortly after its release thanks to the marketing behind it touting it as a treatment for fibromyalgia. This drug basically slows chemical transfers in the brain to regulate hyperactive neurons.

Lyrica produces a calming effect, and some users report the effects as being very similar to those of Valium. Doctors also often prescribe Lyrica for general anxiety disorder, post-surgical pain and some forms of chronic pain.

Lyrica abuse is fairly common, as many people will start to abuse this medication even after it stops working for them. There are also many known negative side effects associated with regular use of the drug, so someone struggling with Lyrica addiction will likely experience these symptoms.

Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepines are a class of prescription medications used to treat anxiety and panic disorders. These drugs are central nervous system depressants that lower excitability and relax the nervous system, allaying the symptoms of panic disorders and anxiety. However, many doctors only prescribe these medications for short-term use, as long-term use can be risky in several ways.

Detox for benzos typically involves flushing the remaining benzo medications from the patient’s system and then reassessing the patient to determine a better course of treatment. Like any other type of substance abuse, benzo addiction recovery is possible through a robust, comprehensive treatment program that addresses the addiction as well as any mental health disorders.

Some of the most commonly prescribed benzodiazepine medications include the following list. Click on any of the names to learn more:

Alprazolam, Also Known as Xanax

Diazepam, Also Known as Valium

Clonazepam, Also Known as Klonopin

Oxazepam, Also Known as Serax

Lorazepam, Also Known as Ativan

Chlordiazepoxide, Also Known as Librium

Soma (Carisoprodol) and Robaxin (Chlorzoxazone)

Muscle relaxant medications are common prescriptions for neuromuscular disorders, muscle pain and spasms. Soma is the most common brand name, but various types of muscle relaxers such as carisoprodol, robaxin and chlorzoxazone all carry significant potential for abuse.

These medications are depressants that treat pain quickly, which unfortunately encourages some patients to abuse them at the first sign of stress.

Soma abuse can lead to severe withdrawal effects, such as:

  • Seizures
  • Convulsions
  • Hallucinations
  • Extreme pain
  • Anxiety
  • Disorientation
  • Psychosis

Ritalin, Adderall and Other Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Medications

Some ADHD medications that require addiction treatment after abuse include:

  • Adderall
  • Ritalin
  • Concerta
  • Dexedrine
  • And more

ADHD medications are generally stimulants that encourage neurotransmitter production in the frontal lobe of the brain. These medications can help improve focus, concentration and sleep patterns in individuals with ADHD. Unfortunately, the stimulating properties of these drugs can lead to abuse from both the people with prescriptions and others who may try to obtain them without a prescription.

Adderall abuse is common on college campuses and in high-stress work environments. A person who doesn’t have ADHD will experience intense focus, improved concentration, heightened energ, and other seemingly positive effects when taking these drugs. However, the drug’s effects are highly habit forming.

Ambien

Zolpidem, sold under the brand name Ambien, is a very powerful sedative prescribed to aid sleep. This drug carries multiple risks, including accidental overdose, dependency and a host of side effects from abuse.

Ambien addiction can lead to:

  • Memory loss
  • Sleep problems
  • Disorientation
  • Nausea
  • Sleepwalking
  • Hallucinations

Primidone and Pentobarbital (Nembutal)

Primidone addiction is common among older males who take the medication, particularly among those who take other medications for multiple sclerosis. This barbiturate is an anticonvulsant and can treat some anxiety disorders as well.

Pentobarbital, often found with the brand name Nembutal, is a more powerful barbiturate and carefully controlled substance. Pentobarbital is also one of the most commonly used drugs for suicide due to its potency and ability to coerce a peaceful, painless death. People who take this drug for longer than absolutely necessary risk creating a dependency once the effects diminish. Accidental death is also a very significant risk.

Loperamide and Imodium

Loperamide, sold under the brand name Imodium, is a laxative medication designed to aid digestion and bowel movements. While this may not sound like an addictive drug, loperamide abuse is fairly common due to the trace amount of opioids present in the drug. This drug is available over the counter without a prescription. Unfortunately, many people suffering from opioid addiction mistakenly believe it is a viable substitute.

Loperamide can actually help some individuals wean themselves off stronger opioids, but there are a host of negative side effects associated with long-term use of the drug, including:

  • Intestinal pain
  • Urinary retention
  • Central nervous system damage
  • Abnormal cardiac behavior
  • And other complications

The Need for Rehab for Prescription Drug Abuse

These medications can all provide health benefits, but it is important to know they can cause dangerous side effects if taken too often. Before taking these kinds of medications, it is extremely important that you weigh the risks and benefits of each.

And finally, keep in mind that entering a comprehensive prescription drug treatment program is the best way to treat any type of prescription drug abuse. At Reflections Recovery Center, we can help you or a loved one find the root cause of addiction and develop proper habits to maintain a long-lasting recovery.

See More on Prescription Drug Risks

After Alcohol Rehab: Preventing Relapse and Ensuring Long-Term Recovery

Learn the Tools to Protect Against Relapse After Alcohol Recovery

Overcoming alcohol or drug addiction is extremely challenging – both mentally and physically. Medically assisted detox and rehabilitation can offer an effective means to overcome dependency and addiction. Continue reading for an overview of the detox, rehabilitation and post-treatment process for alcohol recovery.

How Alcohol Detox Works

Detoxification is the first stage of alcohol treatment for men and women. It involves cleansing the body of alcohol and the toxins in it.

The first step is to stop drinking. After that, the body releases the toxins that are part of dependency, which will give rise to withdrawal symptoms.

Alcohol withdrawal without medical supervision can be dangerous. Of course, withdrawing from any addictive substance is extremely painful and hazardous in certain circumstances. Withdrawal symptoms related to alcoholism, however, are some of the worse.

What Is Medically Assisted Detox?

In some cases, it is possible to go through detox without any kind of medical assistance; we usually do not recommend this, though. Medically assisted detox is when the person who is addicted goes to an alcoholism treatment center for help with recovery.

At these facilities, a staff of medically trained professionals will start by helping the person work through the withdrawal symptoms safely and effectively. The team can also prescribe medications that can ease the pain and discomfort of the symptoms.

Detoxing Without Help

Moment Right Before You Give Up Is Usually When A Miracle Happens - Reflections RecoveryDetoxing alone is not only risky because of dangerous symptoms, but also because of the higher likelihood of relapse.

When people who struggle with alcohol try to detox alone, the odds of not taking a drink when their body goes into convulsions or they begin hallucinating are nearly insurmountable.

When this happens, they often count it as a personal failure, adding to the cycle of addiction.

At a high-quality detox facility for alcoholism, a group of trained professionals can help people suffering from dependency complete the detox stage of addiction.

Stages Of Alcohol Detoxification

After Detox

Counseling Technique: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Alcohol Relapse Prevention

The months after getting out of rehabilitation are the most dangerous time for people struggling with addiction. The temptation to drink again is strong, especially with familiar friends and places haunting them. Having a relapse prevention plan in place can increase a person’s chance of a successful recovery.

For the first three months after treatment, the prevention plan should be updated every month. After that, it should be updated each quarter for the rest of the year. Then, the updates switch to twice a year for the next two years. After three years, the updates happen annually.

More than half of the relapses that people struggling with addiction experience happen in the first six months of recovery, making those months crucial for proper support.

What About Relapse Prevention Meetings?

What You Can Do as a Family Member or Friend

If you have a loved one who is struggling with alcohol dependency, evaluating alcohol addiction recovery programs that suit your loved one is an important first step. However, there are other efforts you can make to help this loved one.

Often, professional interventionists can help convince your family member or friend that going to rehabilitation is the right thing to do. They can also help you choose the correct treatment center for your loved one.

Search for Alcohol Addiction Recovery Programs

There are many different rehab programs for alcoholics, but you should find one with significant experience, compassion and specialized care. Unfortunately, many treatment centers can initially alleviate the addiction through detox, but they don’t give people the proper tools they need to combat the disease in the future. If you’re concerned that a family member’s drinking has become too much for them or you to handle, talk to one of our admissions counselors.

As a place that focuses on recovery for men, Reflections Recovery Center in Prescott, AZ can help men conquer the specific nature of their addiction. We do this by not offering a watered-down version of addiction treatment. Our programs teach men not only how to overcome their addiction while they are in treatment, but also how to maintain sobriety after they leave our facilities.

See Relapse Prevention Tips and Strategies

How to Help a Family Member Addicted to Pain Medication

Opioid addiction is a serious problem in our society and has rightfully been labeled a national epidemic. However, after surgeries or during injuries, some people are looking for relief, and pain medication can be helpful.

Finding a balance between alleviating pain and preventing dependency can be tricky. Dependency can overtake someone’s life quickly, and it’s often easier for a friend or family member to see when an addiction begins to take hold.

Despite pain medication’s help in times of need, many believe that there are other ways to treat pain that shouldn’t lead to addiction. Medical professionals wrote 207 million opioid painkiller prescriptions in 2013, and that number has risen every year since. On a related note, the United States has almost 100 percent of the world’s hydrocodone.

Hydrocodone is an opioid that affects the levels of dopamine in the brain and is often prescribed after a surgery or when someone is recovering from an extremely painful injury. If someone takes it regularly for a while, a tolerance begins to build. This means people need to take more and more of the drug to continue to feel the pain-numbing effects.

If people stop taking the medication, they will be met with painful withdrawal symptoms that they may not even realize are a consequence of stopping the medication. Talking with loved ones about this downward spiral can be difficult, but it’s crucial that they find help for prescription drug abuse.

The Average Timeline of Opioid Withdrawal

Hydrocodone withdrawal generally begins between six and 12 hours after the last dose. This can vary depending on the specific dosage and the length of time the person has taken the medication.

Withdrawal symptoms usually peak within three days and can last any amount of time. Some experience withdrawal symptoms for a week and some for a month. If the person addicted does not find help, relapse can be almost impossible to avoid – if the medication is available. If it isn’t, some turn to street drugs, which create another, more deadly issue.

Opiates act as nervous system depressants, reducing:

  • Breathing rate
  • Heart rate
  • Blood pressure
  • Body temperature

The body eventually becomes dependent on the chemical changes that happen in the brain during this time. When the drug is gone, withdrawal symptoms ensue.

Common Painkiller Withdrawal Symptoms

How to Respond If You See Addiction in a Loved One

Prescription Painkiller Help: Seek Alternative Pain Relief

Your loved one may be afraid to stop taking painkillers – not because of withdrawal symptoms – but for fear of chronic pain. For people who are dealing with chronic pain, it is frightening to think of cutting pharmaceuticals out of their life completely.

You may not have the answer for them in this situation, but a professional interventionist may be able to help. He or she can talk your loved through the need to seek help and discuss methods for pain management that do not involve opioids.

New and Overlooked Pain Relief Techniques

Men’s Rehab for Prescription Drug Abuse

The most important thing that people struggling with addiction need is support. Reflections Recovery Center offers this – along with compassion and professional medical care. We leverage personalized treatment plans and the full continuum of care to offer our clients their highest chance of lifelong recovery.

Get Our Free eBook to Find Out Why Men’s Rehab Works

Why Men's Only Rehab Works - Reflections Recovery Center

Roxicodone Addiction, Withdrawal and Treatment for Detox and Rehab

Balancing Roxicodone Risks of Dependency with Its Benefits

Roxicodone, also known as Roxycodone, is an opioid. More specifically, it is a white crystalline powder that comes from the opium alkaloid thebaine. It has an immediate release, and like many opioids, physicians can prescribe it to help patients deal with intense pain.

Roxicodone Dosing

The dosage of Roxicodone that is assigned to each patient depends on factors such as age, weight and drug tolerance. The level of tolerance for each specific person is different, and previous drug use may be a component in determining how effective it will be in covering someone’s pain. As with all medications, Roxicodone prescriptions take into account a patient’s medical history, including other medications or opioids.

What Roxicodone Is and When to Halt Usage

Know When You're Addicted - Reflections Recovery CenterRoxicodone is a very potent drug, and dependency can happen in a relatively short time. When someone who has become dependent on Roxicodone, or Roxi, stops taking it, withdrawal symptoms will likely occur.

Rather than stopping such a drug immediately, it’s best to wean off the medication to avoid painful withdrawal. The basic guideline is to reduce the dose by 25 to 50 percent each day, while carefully observing how the body and mind react to the change.

If the patient begins experiencing withdrawal symptoms, then the physician might up the dose back to the previous level before decreasing it again, but more slowly this time.

As with any drug a physician prescribes, users should talk to their doctors before ending a medication in any capacity. If you feel like you’ve become too dependent on this opioid pain reliever or another medication, discuss the situation with your doctor. If the dependency on the drug has lead to an addiction, your next call should be to a professional addiction treatment center.

At a certain stage of addiction, tapering off a drug is best done in a hospital or a licensed rehabilitation center, such as Reflections Recovery Center in Prescott. At Reflections, our team can help you safely reduce your dependence under professional supervision.

The Side Effects of Roxicodone

How to Avoid Dependency on Roxicodone

Roxicodone Addiction Signs

Abuse and addiction are different than physical dependence and tolerance. However, if you suspect you are becoming dependent on Roxicodone, it may be time to discuss another type of pain medication to cover your symptoms.

If you stop taking the medication and feel uncomfortable, you are likely in the midst of addiction, and you might feel Roxicodone withdrawal symptoms such as:

  • Restlessness
  • Excessive tear production
  • Excussive mucus
  • Perspiration
  • Chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Backache
  • Joint pain
  • Increased heart rate

Groups that Should Avoid or Limit Roxicodone Use

Roxicodone Rehab Facilities in AZ

A Roxicodone rehab center is the foremost resource for someone dealing with addiction. Reflections Recovery Center is one of these Roxicodone rehab clinics. Here, Roxicodone addiction rehab options are specialized for men, as gender-specific treatment has been proven to be more effective than co-ed rehab programs.

Contact us if you have concerns about Roxicodone addiction signs, or if someone you care about has developed a dependency. Powerful medication is sometimes necessary for pain relief, but when the ill effects start to outweigh the benefits, it’s time for professional care.

Learn About OxyContin Risks and Symptoms

Arizona Opioid and Heroin Trends in 2018

Statistics on Arizona Opioid and Heroin Trends

The United States makes up around 5 percent of the planet’s total population but uses approximately 80 percent of the opioid supply around the world. Additionally, one in four people who have been prescribed opioids for long periods in a primary care environment end up struggling with addiction.

Arizona Opioid Addiction Statistics 2018

Arizona High School Students Active Heroin Use - Reflections Recovery CenterFour out of 10 adults in Arizona know someone who struggles with an addiction to prescription painkillers.

In 2016, a total of 431 million opioid pills were prescribed to patients. That number of pills is enough for every person in the state of Arizona to have a two-and-a-half-week supply of opioids.

Opioid deaths, prescription drug deaths and heroin deaths have all increased since 2012. In fact, heroin fatalities in Arizona have tripled and opioid deaths have skyrocketed.

This all spells an epidemic that opiate drug rehabs in Arizona and throughout the nation are doing their best to clean up.

Estimated Non-Fatal Overdoses in the Past 8 Months

The crisis has taken such a toll in Arizona – and throughout the United States – that statistics are unfolding in months, rather than years. Some areas of the country are harder hit than others, and Arizona is high on the list of states suffering from opioid deaths. As you might suspect, some parts of the state suffer more than others.

Metro Tucson Non-Fatal Overdoses

Metro Phoenix Non-Fatal Overdoses

Other Arizona County Non-Fatal Overdoses

Common Arizona Ages for Opioid Use

To get a sense of how the opioid crisis is impacting state residents, consider the ages of those most affected. The statistics from this year and the last decade highlight who becomes dependent and at what point addiction takes hold.

Most Frequent Ages for Possible Overdoses This Year

Children Affected by Opioid Addiction

Fatalities Among Different Age Groups over Last 10 Years

Overdose Hospitalizations and Deaths in Arizona

American Opioid Overdose Statistic InfographicFrom 2007 to 2016, hospitalizations due to prescription opioids rose by 64 per 100,000 people in Arizona. The peak was in 2011, with 162 hospitalizations per 100,000 people.

Of the possible opioid overdoses in the last eight months, 14 percent of those people were hospitalized in 2016 for a reason that involved opioid use. About 13 percent of the people who were hospitalized in 2016 died in the last eight months from a drug overdose.

As those statistics indicate, the period after someone is released from an overdose is a dangerous time.

Seeking help from a treatment center like the men’s rehabilitation programs at Reflections Recovery Center is the best way to start turning things around. Reflections uses personalized treatments and the calming attributes of nature to offer support and comfort during this dangerous time.

Prescription Drug Overdoses and Fatalities in Arizona

Drug use statistics reveal that 39 percent of the people who experienced a possible opioid overdose in the past eight months had a prescription for opioids at least two months before their overdose. About 2 percent of the people who overdosed died as a result.

Of the fatal overdoses, 29 percent of them were using only prescription opioids and were not using any other types of drugs. Meanwhile, 32 percent of this group used more than one drug.

Though it is more dangerous to be taking multiple types of drugs, even just one prescription opioid medication can be fatal if taken too often or in large quantities.

The Use of Naloxone to Counteract Overdose

Best Heroin Treatment Centers

If you’re looking for a drug rehab in Gilbert, AZ, Mesa, Chandler or Phoenix, consider heading up north a short ways instead. Prescott’s Reflections Recovery Center is located apart from the bustling metro areas and offers many desirable amenities and services.

Reflections offers a men-only program, which, for many, is more conducive to long-term recovery than the standard co-ed experience. Reflections focuses on clinical and holistic treatment, as well as using the outdoors to help men in recovery get the tools they need to avoid relapse.

Learn About the Symptoms of Heroin Abuse