Tag Archives: Adderall

Adderall Cocktail Mixing: Dangerous Drug Pairings Detailed

Mixing drugs is an unfortunately common occurrence in the United States, but many people mistakenly believe some drugs to be less dangerous than others are. The reality is that most drugs have the potential to cause serious and even life-threatening medical complications under the right circumstances.

Similarly, mixing drugs – even prescription drugs – with certain other substances has the potential to cause devastating results.

Why Is Mixing Drugs Dangerous?

When a doctor issues a prescription for a certain type of medication, he or she must check the patient’s medical records and known drug history to identify any potentially dangerous allergies or interactions. Doctors also provide prescriptions under the assumption that patients will follow the instructions for proper use to the letter.

Unfortunately, some patients may misunderstand a doctor’s instructions or may believe that mixing a prescription drug with another substance won’t be harmful.

Risks of Adderall Abuse

Adderall is most commonly prescribed for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Unfortunately, Adderall abuse has become one of the leading types of prescription drug abuse in the U.S.

When used correctly for a qualifying condition, Adderall can help manage the symptoms of ADHD and improve:

  • Focus
  • Attention span
  • Short-term memory
  • Motivation

However, Adderall also carries a high potential for abuse, due to the fact it is a very powerful stimulant.

Adderall’s side effects can include several negative symptoms when abused or misused. A person who starts to take Adderall beyond the scope of their prescription may experience long-lasting bursts of energy followed by crashing.

It’s also possible for Adderall to interfere with sleep cycles. This amphetamine drug can also cause paranoia, aggression, mood swings, rapid heart rate and a host of other symptoms. When an individual combines Adderall with other drugs, the risk of adverse side effects dramatically increases, and the effects will differ based on the other substance used.

Adderall and Heroin Abuse

If a person who has a prescription for Adderall starts abusing heroin, there are many possible consequences. On the street, “speedball” is a common term for a combination of an “upper” like Adderall and a “downer” like heroin.

Some people mistakenly believe that a speedball offers the benefits of both drugs while canceling out the negative effects, but this is not the case. Adderall mixed with heroin simply increases the chances of suffering the adverse effects of both drugs at the same time.

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Adderall and Cocaine Abuse

Cocaine abuse isn’t as widespread as it was in the United States during the 1970s and 1980s, but it is still a problem for countless Americans. Combined Adderall and cocaine effects can include:

  • Rapid heart rate
  • Extreme spurts of energy and alertness
  • Hyperactivity
  • Trouble breathing

Both of these substances are powerful stimulants. Taking both together greatly increases the risk of heart attack and brain damage.

Mixing Adderall and Alcohol

Similar to the thinking behind a speedball, many people combine Adderall with alcohol in an attempt to experience the benefits of both without the negative side effects. A person may drink to calm down from the burst of energy that Adderall offers, or may use Adderall to wake up from the sleepiness that alcohol intoxication can cause.

Unfortunately, the effects of Adderall can make it harder for the person to feel the effects of alcohol, encouraging him or her to drink more alcohol than he or she normally would; this increases the risk of alcohol poisoning. Additionally, long-term patterns of combining Adderall and alcohol can lead to heart failure and other cardiac conditions.

Xanax and Adderall Abuse

Xanax is a benzodiazepine medication that can treat the symptoms of anxiety disorders. It can produce feelings of calmness and relaxation, the polar opposite of what Adderall causes.

While there are no immediate dangers of taking both together, doing so can greatly increase the risk of developing an addiction to either or both substances. Since these medications effectively counteract each other’s effects, a person who takes both may feel diminished effects of both, eventually encouraging him or her to take more of either than necessary.

Adderall and Marijuana Use

Marijuana’s legal status is a hot topic of public discussion, as many states have legalized medical marijuana, and a few have even decriminalized recreational pot. No matter how a person obtains marijuana, it’s important to know the risks of combining it with Adderall.

Combining marijuana and Adderall has the potential to increase the user’s risk of heart failure. Additionally, these two substances counteract one another and may encourage the user to ingest more than necessary, which can speed up the development of Adderall addiction.

Methadone and Adderall Use

Methadone is a common prescription for opioid addiction. This synthetic opioid medication can help a person transition away from harder opioids like heroin or prescription painkillers. But, methadone also carries the potential for abuse on its own.

When combined with Adderall, the stimulant can actually mask the signs of methadone overdose, potentially putting the individual’s life at risk.

Methadone abuse can lead to respiratory depression, coma, heart failure and a host of other complications. Adderall can effectively keep a person alert and moving through the early stages of an overdose. Meanwhile, others nearby may not recognize the danger before it is too late.

Adderall and Methamphetamine Abuse

Methamphetamine (or simply “meth”) is a very powerful synthetic stimulant capable of severe side effects on its own. Adderall and meth together become a very powerful surge of stimulants that can have devastating consequences.

Meth on its own can cause:

  • Delirium
  • Aggression
  • Heightened energy
  • Personality changes
  • Severe brain damage

Combining meth with another stimulant like Adderall, especially over repeated episodes, is something you wouldn’t wish on your worst enemy.

Risk of Overdosing on Drug Cocktails

Most forms of substance abuse carry a risk of overdose, and it’s essential to acknowledge the risk of overdosing that Adderall presents on its own. Some patients who take Adderall may start using the drug in different ways for more pronounced effects. For example, snorting Adderall produces the desired effects much more quickly, but it also dramatically increases the risk of overdose.

Adderall Overdose on Its Own

It’s possible to overdose on Adderall alone. Too much of the drug in a short time or a concentrated dose can cause tremors throughout the body, irregular heartbeat, difficulty breathing and several other adverse effects – including episodes of mania or even psychosis.

Most people who combine Adderall with other drugs do so to either counteract or enhance the effects of Adderall, and some take Adderall to counteract or enhance the effects of other drugs.

Some people who experience illicit drug withdrawal may start taking Adderall for its stimulating properties. They may feel relief from the symptoms of withdrawing from other drugs, but this relief is short lived and creates more problems.

For example, opioid withdrawal can cause extreme fatigue and depression, and a dose of Adderall may temporarily relieve these symptoms, thanks to this amphetamine’s stimulating properties. Eventually, this type of use will lead to Adderall abuse and make an already bad situation worse.

Getting Help for Adderall Cocktail Mixing and Abuse

An overdose can lead to respiratory failure, coma or death in a very short time without medical intervention. When an individual abuses Adderall with another illicit drug, these interactions can produce extreme results very quickly.

It’s essential to acknowledge the risks of Adderall abuse and how it can interact with other drugs – licit or illicit. A person who takes Adderall with a prescription may assume that it is safe simply because a doctor prescribed it, but this is only true when the patient takes it exactly as intended and directed.

Additionally, individuals who take other prescriptions or who abuse illicit drugs cannot fall into the trap of believing that Adderall can cancel out the effects of those other substances. If you know someone who has been using Adderall in a dangerous way, reach out to Reflections Recovery Center for guidance on how you can help stop their drug abuse.

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Long-Term Prescription Stimulant Use: What Are the Risks of ADHD Medications?

The millennial generation is the first in history to be routinely prescribed stimulant medications like Adderall, Ritalin and Concerta to treat the symptoms of ADHD. Not surprisingly, many in this generation are also suffering from issues with stimulant drug abuse. Studies show that the recreational use of ADHD medications is the second-most common form of illicit drug use among college-aged adults, just behind marijuana.

The rise in young adults taking ADHD medications is shocking. In fact, in the four-year period between 2011 and 2015, the number of American workers who tested positive for amphetamine drug use increased by 44 percent.

Because stimulant ADHD medications are prescribed by doctors, many users mistakenly believe that there is little to no danger associated with taking them long-term. In reality, however, these drugs have a powerful effect on users, and extended use should never be taken lightly. Let’s take a closer look at the effects of long-term ADHD medication use.

Long-Term Adderall Abuse and the Brain

Stimulant ADHD medications increase energy levels and focus by artificially increasing the amount of specific neurotransmitters in the brain. The primary neurotransmitters affected by Adderall, for instance, are:

  • Dopamine
  • Norepinephrine
  • Serotonin

Over time, the brain adjusts to these elevated levels of neurotransmitters and loses its ability to produce enough of them without the use of drugs. Habitual amphetamine users, for example, often suffer from low dopamine levels, which greatly reduces the ability to feel joy or pleasure without chemical assistance. When the user’s tolerance to the effects of stimulants increases, they often become unable to function normally without them.

Those addicted to Adderall and Adderall-like drugs experience a number of troubling psychological symptoms upon stopping use, including:

  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Insomnia
  • Lack of motivation
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Mood swings
  • Aggression
  • Suicidal thinking

Many researchers believe that the emotional and psychological effects of long-term ADHD medication abuse are the greatest risks users face. In extreme cases, prescription stimulants have been known to trigger the onset of serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia, psychosis and bipolar disorder. Those with a preexisting mental health disorder are at an elevated risk for developing negative side effects after long-term stimulant medication use.

The Dangers of Childhood Stimulant Use

Childhood Prescription Stimulant Use - Reflections Rehab
Those who take prescription ADHD medications at a young age are at a unique risk for developing future issues with drug abuse. In addition to the effects that stimulants have on brain chemistry, they also play a powerful role in a person’s behavioral and emotional development.

Because Adderall and Ritalin help to increase energy levels and motivation, those who take these drugs during childhood often report that they never developed the ability to accomplish tasks and goals while unmedicated. While many outgrow their ADHD symptoms upon reaching adulthood, many childhood Adderall users find that they are unable to function effectively without drugs.

It is important to remember that even though ADHD medications can be used therapeutically and legally, there is always the possibility that long-term use can have serious, lifelong consequences.

Research on Long-Term Stimulant Use

Studies have suggested that the therapeutic effects of prescription ADHD medications begin to disappear when taken for longer than two years.

This research suggests that the long-term treatment of ADHD symptoms with amphetamine drugs may be ineffective. While not all health care professionals share this opinion, the growing body of research cannot be ignored.

A study published in 2017 in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry found that long-term Adderall and Ritalin use was ineffective for long-term ADHD treatment. In addition, this study found that ADHD medications may also suppress psychological development well into adulthood.

Symptoms of Stimulant Medication Abuse

There are a number of physical side effects associated with the abuse of ADHD medications. Over the long term, amphetamine abuse can lead to problems in both the heart and cardiovascular systems. The most common of these problems include hypertension (high blood pressure) and tachycardia (irregular heart rate). Although rare, amphetamine abuse can even lead to sudden cardiac arrest and death.

Other side effects of long-term Adderall abuse include:

  • Headaches
  • Constipation
  • Hyperactivity
  • Insomnia
  • Heart disease
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Weight loss
  • Tooth decay
  • Heart palpitations
  • Respiratory trouble
  • Dizziness

Recognizing ADHD Medication Abuse

Again, because doctors routinely prescribe amphetamine medications to Americans with ADHD, it can be difficult to recognize when the use of such drugs has become problematic. Recognizing the warning signs of amphetamine abuse is the first step toward correcting the problem before it’s too late.

Signs that a loved one has developed a harmful amphetamine habit include:

  • Prioritizing stimulant medication use over one’s responsibilities
  • Taking more of stimulant medication than prescribed
  • An inability to function without stimulant drugs
  • Misrepresenting one’s psychological symptoms in order to obtain ADHD medications
  • An inability to either stop or control one’s use of ADHD medications
  • Transitioning to the use of street amphetamines or methamphetamine

Overcoming Prescription Stimulant Use

Breaking an addiction to stimulant drugs is incredibly difficult, especially when the use of such drugs began in childhood. A key part of any effective drug abuse treatment program is identifying the underlying problems that led to addiction.

Those abusing drugs like Adderall and Ritalin may need help coping with their attention issues naturally. Often, these underlying issues stem from other undiagnosed psychological disorders. Therapeutic tools such as group counseling and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can aid those struggling with addiction in achieving stronger mental health.

If you or someone you love is struggling with an addiction to prescription stimulants, know that there are people who can help. Contact a member of our team at Reflections Recovery Center today, and discover how our men’s rehabilitation program can help you retake control over your life.

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Is Adderall the Legal Version of Meth?

In recent years, more children and adults are being prescribed Adderall to treat ADHD symptoms. With more people being prescribed this drug, the risk of improper use and Adderall addiction has increased. This has led to studies being conducted that compare Adderall with its counterpart, Methamphetamines.

These studies have shown a number of similarities as well as a few differences between the two drugs. This had led many to question if Adderall is a safe treatment for ADHD in children and adults or if the drug is being overprescribed with little to no proof of the diagnosis. Adults are beginning to claim to exhibit signs of ADHD simply to gain a prescription to take this highly addictive stimulant legally.

Similarities Between Adderall and Meth

There are several similarities between Adderall and Meth. The most noticeable similarity is the effects the drugs have on the person taking them. Both drugs are stimulants that increase attention and focus as well as energy. This reaction is often the reason people begin using either drug. High school and college students may begin using either Adderall when studying for finals and athletes may use them to increase performance and stamina on the field. This usage will often lead to Adderall dependency when used over time. It is also common for teenagers and adults to begin using Meth as a way to lose weight quickly. In fact, Meth has been previously prescribed to help obese people to lose weight. Both Adderall and Meth cause a lack of appetite, increased blood pressure and heart rate, and elevated energy levels.

Differences Between Adderall and Meth

One of the primary differences is in the chemical compound used to create each drug. Adderall is a mix of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine salts. Methamphetamine is double methylated phenylethylamine. The double methylation of the chemical process when creating methamphetamines allows the drug to be lipid soluble. This term means that the chemicals used in methamphetamines are able to cross what is called the blood brain barrier. This cross of the barrier allows the chemicals to negatively affect the brain cells and tissue of the individual who is using the substance.

Adderall studies have shown improved social and cognitive abilities in those who are prescribed the drug. Students with ADHD who take Adderall as prescribed by their physician have be seen to have more self-control, focus, exhibit a slight increase in IQ, and improved relationships with family and friends. Methamphetamines, on the other hand, showed a decrease in these areas after prolonged use.

Is Adderall Addictive?

While Adderall may not cross the blood brain barrier and may show improvement in symptoms of ADHD when used as prescribed, there are many people who take the drug without a prescription. Recent studies have shown that approximately 30% of all Adderall Prescribed is sold or given away illegally. As with any narcotic drug, the prolonged use without medical monitoring can increase the risk of addiction.

Risks of Adderall Addiction

One of the biggest risks for those who illegally use Adderall is that when they are unable to afford or find a supply of Adderall, the closest drug to it is methamphetamines. The most common methamphetamine used illegally is Crystal Meth. This drug is typically manufactured by the person selling it. It can cause teeth to become loose and rotten until you have what is referred to as “Meth Mouth”.
One of the other risks of Adderall addiction is the risk of heart attack or stroke with prolonged or excessive use of the drug. Both Adderall and Methamphetamines increase your blood pressure and heart rate. Having and elevated blood pressure or heart rate without proper medical monitoring for long periods of time increases this risk.

Are Adderall and Meth the Same?

When looking at Adderall compared to meth, the similarities are clear. However, many people defend the legal use of Adderall because doctors can prescribe it unlike Crystal Meth which is sold only on the streets. The side effects are the same for both drugs and the risk of addiction for each drug is high. Another similarity between the two drugs is the addiction recovery and detox process.

Signs of Adderall Addiction

There are a number of Adderall and Methamphetamine addiction symptoms including:

  • Sleeping for long periods of time
  • Loss of appetite
  • Social withdrawal
  • Unusual excitability
  • Financial troubles
  • Aggression
  • Being overly talkative
  • Secretive behavior

Your loved one may exhibit all or only a few of these symptoms but, it is important to be in tune with these symptoms and know how and where to get them the help they need.

Detox and Recovery

Before you say, “I can’t quit Adderall”, remember that there have been many people in your situation that have successfully completed an Adderall detox program and gone on to live successful and healthy lives. Our Adderall addiction treatment program is designed to help you succeed in your recovery.

During the detox and recovery program, our staff will work to support you through proper nutrition, group and individual counseling as well as outdoor and relaxation activities. We are also here to support you as you work to rebuild the relationships in your life whether it be family or friends.

What Next?

If you or a loved one is suffering from Adderall addiction, know that you are not alone. With the recent heroin and crystal meth epidemics across the nation, many people have forgotten the dangers of prescription stimulants. However, there are prescription drug rehab programs for ADHD medication and Reflections Recovery Center is one such place.

Our addiction recovery program is a men’s only program that focuses on holistic treatment of addiction. We will treat the physical symptoms of your addiction as well as the mental and emotional causes of the addiction. Many people who are suffering from addiction also suffer from mental health issues as well. Adderall and Methamphetamine addictions can often cause emotional and mental symptoms that may surface after the detox process has started.  Our staff will be there to support you throughout the entire process.

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