Tag Archives: depression

“I Hate My Life”: Expression or Depression?

“I hate my life.”

Have you ever heard these words from a loved one? Or even said them yourself? 

It’s not uncommon for people to experience discouragement or a lack of motivation to complete regular daily tasks following a traumatic event or life change. However, continuously feeling defeated or that one is tired of life, are sentiments typically expressed by a person experiencing low grade depression.

Left unaddressed, these types of thoughts can grow into a crippling depression that has long-lasting effects. One of the most potent side effects of a crippling depression is chronic apathy.

The definition of apathy is a lack of feeling, interest, enthusiasm or concern.

It is almost impossible for the average person to go through life without ever experiencing apathy at some point. Sufferers from depression, however–especially if it leads to substance abuse–often report an inability to escape from apathetic thinking. 

Apathy is defined as a lack of feeling, interest, enthusiasm, or concern.

What is the difference between someone who is experiencing low grade depression vs someone who just feels apathetic? 

Having a “low” day, or a temporary mindset of feeling defeated can occur after events that overwhelm the emotions, mind, body and spirit. These might include death of a loved one, job loss, abusive relationships, extreme loneliness and even traumatic injury or chronic health conditions.

It’s not uncommon for these events to serve as a catalyst for depressive episodes that continue throughout life. Most often, though, these evens lead to periods of apathy only in the short term. 

On the other hand, someone who is suffering from crippling depression–or, on the opposite end of the spectrum, debilitating anxiety–tends to experience these feelings on a regular or even daily basis over a longer period of time.

Apathetic feelings in the average person can still be subject to the will to change negative thinking patterns or habits. Mental health sufferers, however, report that apathy in the context of depression seems to numb their ability to even want to change.

Having a "low" day, or a temporary mindset of feeling defeated can occur after events that overwhelm the emotions, mind, body, and spirit.

This “numbness” or lack of control is further compounded if substance abuse enters the picture. 

How could feeling that “I hate my life” lead to substance abuse?

Unfortunately, depression can contribute to the development of a substance use disorder (SUD). SUD can, in turn, escalate low grade depression into crippling depression. This is because people often seek illicit substances (or overmedication of legal substances) as a way to escape pain. 

Many people believe addiction is born out of a desire to attain the pleasure of a high.

While this is true in some cases, more often than not addiction victims report that the main motivation behind their first one or several uses of drugs or alcohol was to dull or eliminate–not to achieve–something: namely, pain.

SUD victims then proceed to fall into a cycle of apathy that keeps them trapped in addictive habits. Their increasing tolerance to a drug or alcohol substance may lead them to take more and more of it to escape the mental pain of debilitating anxiety or feeling tired of life.

The more the cravings rule their lives, the more powerless they feel to break out of this lifestyle. 

The feeling of being out of control and/or purposeless can lead to substance abuse and addiction. Addiction leads to more feelings of lack of control and defeat, for which substances seem to be the only cure. And the cycle repeats.

Getting Help

The progression described above is vicious and can have devastating effects on a person’s quality of life. Because of the nature of addiction, this cycle can be difficult to break, but it is entirely possible with help. If you or someone you know is suffering from addiction, professional treatment is the most effective way to start the road to recovery. Contact us today.

Lyrica Withdrawal

Lyrica, or pregabalin, is a prescription drug for neuropathic pain and seizures. However, it is also known to be addictive. It is possible for it contribute to destructive habits, serious depression, and suicidal thoughts. With long-term misuse or abuse, withdrawal is a real possibility. Lyrica withdrawal can be dangerous and uncomfortable if done alone. It is always best to stop use under medical supervision or to seek treatment for help in dealing with withdrawal.

What is Lyrica?

Pregabalin works by binding to the alpha 2 delta site in the central nervous system (CNS). This calms down nerves and creates pain relief for those suffering neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is caused by damaged nerve endings, which can be caused by other diseases such as diabetes, shingles, or fibromyalgia. Lyrica can also be a useful medication for stopping or preventing focal seizures. While it is a useful drug in some situations, Lyrica potentially includes a host of different side effects such as: 

  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Dry mouth
  • Constipation
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Weight gain
  • Blurred vision
  • Unusual bruising
  • Unsteadiness
  • Confusion
  • Muscle pain 
  • Swelling extremities 
  • Kidney issues 
  • Depression
  • Suicidal thoughts 
  • Anxiety

lyrica side effects

Lyrica Addiction

Lyrica addiction is uncommon, but it is possible for it to occur. Its negative effects have become more prevalent in recent years as prescriptions for it become more frequent. In the United States alone, over 64 million prescriptions were written for Lyrica (or some form of pregabalin) in 2016 alone. Given the high frequency of prescriptions, it is no wonder that the deaths associated with it have risen as well. 

It is possible to experience addiction when it is taken in high enough doses. Misusing it can provide a euphoric feeling and can even create feelings of dissociation in some individuals. Any drug or substance that creates feelings of euphoria has the potential for dependence and addiction. It is the ‘high’ most drugs offer which keep individuals coming back. This is especially true for people with pre-existing mental health conditions, since they may seek out experiences which can help them escape negative thoughts and feelings. 

Lyrica and depression

There are links between Lyrica, depression, and suicide. According to a study conducted by the University of Oxford looked at nearly 200,000 cases of individuals who used pregabalin between the years of 2006 to 2013 and found that 5.2% (over 10,000 people) were treated for suicidal behavior or died from suicide. A further 8.9% experienced overdoses and 6.3% were involved in serious car accidents. The study found that those using pregabalin were 26% more likely to experience suicidal behavior and 24% were likely to experience an overdose. 

lyrica side effects

The recent increase in pregabalin-related deaths and injuries became so severe that the United Kingdom reclassified the drug as a Class C Drug. This made it illegal to own or possess any amount of the drug, sell the drug, or to import it. The United States Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) considers the drug to be a Schedule 5 controlled substance. This means it is recognized as a drug with a lower potential for abuse but can still cause harm.

Lyrica Withdrawal

Abruptly stopping Lyrica is potentially dangerous to your health. With addiction or even dependence, care is necessary in order to avoid painful withdrawal symptoms. What is a withdrawal? Simply put, it is your body’s reaction to learning to cope without a constant supply of a stimulus. If you have been taking Lyrica for a number of years and suddenly stop, your body may struggle while learning how to survive without it. 

Withdrawals are often incredibly painful and in some cases cause death or require hospitalization. The withdrawal symptoms for Lyrica are similar to that of alcohol and benzodiazepines. However, the severity depends on length of drug usage, the dosage, and the user’s history of abuse with other drugs.

Lyrica withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Headaches
  • Anxiety
  • Confusion
  • Depression
  • Sweating
  • Rapid heart beats
  • Seizures
  • Insomnia
  • Cravings 
  • Mood swings
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea

lyrica withdrawal symptoms

It is possible for these symptoms to occur individually, or all at once. They typically begin 1-2 days after someone stops using Lyrica. The most at-risk patients are those who depend on the drug for anti-seizure medication. This danger is why supervision from medical and mental health professionals is always necessary for quitting Lyrica.

withdrawal is your body's reaction to learning to cope without a constant supply of a stimulus

How long does Lyrica stay in your system?

It is rare for employers or medical providers to test for Lyrica. However, it is still detectable in the body. How long it will stay in your system depends on various factors. Age, gender, genetic, metabolism, body-fat composition, and weight all play a role in determining how long the drug stays in someone’s system. 

Via urine test, it is possible to detect Lyrica  up to 6 days after ingestion, 2 days with a blood and saliva test and up to 6 months with a hair follicle test. Lyrica’s half-life is approximately 6 hours. A substance’s half-life indicates how long it takes for the ingested amount to reduce to half of its original size. In other words, if you ingest 10mg of Lyrica, it takes 6 hours for the drug to reduce to 5mg.

Getting help 

Deciding to seek help is a crucial step on the road to full recovery. Getting clean takes more than “willpower” –  it requires long-term effort and most of all, real support. Since addiction is so complex, it’s important to reach out for meaningful help. If you or a loved one are struggling with addiction, please contact us today to begin your journey to sobriety.

Agitated Depression

Most people see depression as black and white – you either have it or you don’t. However, depression can present itself in many different forms, making treatment more complicated. Agitated depression is one form that is often overlooked, but it is just as serious. If it isn’t treated, it can feed into substance abuse cycles and damage long-term well-being. 

What is Agitated Depression?

Agitated depression is a type of depression which comes with strong feelings of restlessness and anger. Though it is not a medical term, it is a good description of some people’s symptoms. It usually means a combination of depression and anxiety.  Agitation is common in people who deal with major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. 

So what is the main difference between ‘normal’ depression and agitated depression? Major depression on its own does not usually cause agitated behavior. Typically, there is an additional underlying cause to the agitation, but it can heighten and complicate the depressive feelings. 

Agitated Depression

What is Agitation?

Agitation can have several symptoms:

  • Angry outbursts
  • Impulsive behavior
  • Inability to sit still
  • Tension
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability
  • Clenching fists
  • Problems focusing
  • Pacing
  • Fidgeting 

It is essentially a very restless state. Agitation can be the result of being in a new environment, being uncomfortable, recovering from substance abuse and dependency, or having alcohol in the system. Though it can be very difficult to pinpoint the direct source of agitation, some studies have found a strong correlation between substance dependence and agitation.  

What is Depression?

Depression has varying levels of severity. It is the most common mental illness in the United States, and over 17.3 million adults reported experiencing at least one depressive episode in 2017. Depression often comes with persistent feelings of sadness or loss of interest in activities you once found enjoyable. The causes of depression are very diverse and can be difficult to accurately identify. However, there have been strong ties found between depression and substance abuse. Typically, individuals consume drugs as a means of altering their state of mind or avoiding their own reality. When not under the influence and faced with the facts of their life, people with depression can come face to face with feelings of helplessness and hopelessness. Mental illness coupled with substance use disorders are collectively referred to as co-occurring disorders, and a reported 8.5 million adults dealt with some form of a co-occurring disorder in 2017.

Agitated Depression

Symptoms of depression include:

  • Feeling sad
  • Hating life
  • Loss of interest in activities
  • Changes in appetite 
  • Loss of energy
  • Lethargy 
  • Insomnia 
  • Feelings of worthlessness 
  • Feelings of guilt 
  • Suicidal thoughts

Depression does not develop the same way for everyone, but it does tend to follow certain patterns. Often, the disease progresses slowly over time. However, sudden tragic events can also trigger it, such as physical trauma or the death of a loved one. Depression is a curable illness, but overcoming it is more likely with personal attention from a trained professional. If depression is left untreated, it can cause long term emotional damage and even lead to suicide. 

What is a Co-Ocurring Disorder?

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) defines Dual Diagnosis (or co-occurring disorder) as the simultaneous experience of substance abuse disorders and mental illness. Either the mental illness or substance use disorder can develop first and cause the other disease to appear. Dual diagnosis can create a vicious cycle of bad habits. Some people choose to get high as a way of avoiding their depression, for example. If the depression is never truly treated, they may simply resort to drugs each time their depression symptoms flare up. With enough use, this “self medication” becomes a habit, causing a recurring cycle of depression and drug abuse. It can get out of hand very quickly and needs to be treated by a mental health professional. 

Suicide Prevention

Depression is one of the leading causes of suicide. Suicide on its own is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and 2nd leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 34. In 2018, an estimated 48,000 people committed suicide in the US alone. Given that depression is a major catalyst for suicide, emphasis should be placed on treatment. An estimated two thirds of individuals suffering from depression do not seek treatment. 

Treatment

Depression is something many people are familiar with. However, it is not an end state. Treatment, recovery and happiness are absolutely achievable. Changing lifestyle habits can be an effective way of dealing with depression, though managing symptoms does not solve the problem. In order to cure the illness, you have to address the root causes, rather than just treat symptoms. Getting help from a professional who can help address the causes of depression and agitation can increase your chances of recovery. If you or someone you know has been suffering from agitated depression and substance abuse, contact us today so we can help on your road to recovery. 

Tired of Life

For many of us, stress and anxiety are part of life.  However, you should never ignore or brush them off. If left alone, these “everyday” feelings can develop into depression or a sense of dread and general exhaustion. Over time, mental health disorders can make you more susceptible to drug use, or even worsen addiction symptoms. Feeling tired of life is something to take seriously. However, this condition is far from hopeless. There are many effective, proven routes toward regaining your mental health, sobriety, and overall happiness. 

What is Depression?

Depression is a very misunderstood condition. Oftentimes, people associate depression with general feelings of sadness. They may also assume a depressed person should just be able to “snap out of it.” While everyone experiences sadness in life, clinical depression is a very different issue. 

Clinical depression (or major depression) is a disorder characterized by persistent depressive moods and behavior. Someone dealing with depression may lose interest in activities they once enjoyed and distance from friends and family. The disorder can also contribute to substance abuse problems. Depression can seriously affect sleep, appetite, energy levels, and day-to-day activities. Some people with high functioning depression can hide their sadness and loss of interest in life from those around them. However, this doesn’t mean their condition is any less serious or worthy of attention.

What Does it Mean to be Tired of Life?

Depression and existential dread often go hand in hand. In other words, life can begin to feel unenjoyable or even meaningless. When people say that they are tired of life, they generally mean they are tired of the routine they have fallen into and their lives lack excitement. However, feelings like this can turn into major depression. They can also factor into relapse for people with a substance abuse history.

Tired of Life

Addiction and Mental Health

Addiction and mental health are two very closely related issues. They can feed off each other, and one can cause or contribute to the other. In the medical world, examining both issues from a causation standpoint is known as Dual Diagnosis. Research showed that 60 percent of adolescents with a substance use disorder (SUD) also have some form of mental illness. 

So why are the two so connected? The U.S Library of Medicine found three possible answers to this question:

  1. There may be common risk factors between SUD and mental illness such as genetics or trauma. 
  2. Mental disorders can lead to SUD. For example, someone dealing with feelings of sadness or depression may choose to use drugs to artificially elevate their mood.
  3. SUD can lead to mental disorders. Drugs will change the chemistry in your brain to make it more susceptible to depression and other mental illnesses. Further, individuals who are abusing drugs may recognize their problem, but feel helpless in stopping it. This can seriously affect their emotional well-being. 

How do You Treat a Dual Diagnosis?

Dual diagnosis treatment is a holistic approach. Healthcare providers consider which condition started first and how it has impacted the other. For example, if a mental illness was already present when drug use started, it can be identified as the primary catalyst for the issue. Both issues must be addressed fully. Simply managing symptoms will not create a lasting solution. 

Integrated treatment is often the best option for someone with a dual diagnosis. It generally combines rehabilitation that can treat both drug abuse and mental health disorders. These steps will be different for each person. Professionals directly address someone’s individual problems and seek to treat the root cause or causes. 

Tired of Life

Treatment Types

Detoxification

The major first step in an integrated intervention is detoxing the body of any present substances. In a medically-supervised detox, this can involve giving the patient small doses of the drug over a certain period of days in order to taper them off and soften withdrawal symptoms. Going “cold turkey,” or quitting suddenly, often leads to incredibly painful withdrawals which can make sobriety seem impossible.

Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy revolves around cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). This treatment type helps individuals identify negative thinking patterns in an effort to change those behaviors. 

Medications

The use of medications during an integrated intervention is carefully monitored so as to not create an additional dependency as a means of solving a previous one. However, medications can be genuinely helpful when treating mental health disorders.

Supportive Housing

Supportive housing, or a sober home, is a place where people with similar sobriety goals live together and hold each other accountable. They provide mutual support through their respective recovery journeys. Often, they attend meetings or other support groups together. 

Support Groups

Joining a support group such as Alcoholics Anonymous is another step in the integrated intervention program. It allows patients to tell their stories and share their lives in a judgement-free zone. This is often an extremely beneficial outlet for people with mental health issues.

Tired of Life

Getting Help if You Feel Tired of Life

For someone struggling with mental health, substance abuse, or both, seeking professional treatment is the best route towards real, meaningful healing. If you or a loved one is experiencing addiction or depression symptoms, get help now. Contact us today so we can help you begin your journey to lifelong recovery. Or consider a partner facility for drug rehab in Prescott, Arizona.

Existential Loneliness

Loneliness is defined as the feeling of being socially and emotionally isolated. You may not have to physically be separated from friends and family in order to feel lonely. However, the impact of feeling empty, alone or unwanted can lead to feelings of depression and anxiety. 

What is an existential crisis?

Existential loneliness and having an existential crisis are very similar. Any matter which evolves into an existential one usually involves questions of your existence. In other words, you are often finding yourself wondering what the purpose behind your life is. Your loneliness and feelings of separation can cause you to question your purpose in life. Many times this issue becomes a self-created problem. Most people are familiar with feelings of sadness and loneliness, which seem to worsen other problems. It can begin to snowball from “I feel lonely” to “I don’t have a job because x, y and z” and develop into “everything is bad.”

These feelings sometimes result in nihilistic thinking where you eventually believe that nothing means anything and life is meaningless. In essence, this captures what an existential crisis is. So why would this be important to someone who deals with substance abuse? Well, these feelings of existentialism, loneliness and questioning life can lead to depression. Further, there is proof to show that depression and substance abuse have a bi-directional relationship. Meaning individuals dealing with depression are more likely to suffer from substance abuse and vice-versa.

Existential questions

Pondering existential questions is potentially a healthy activity when the mindset and purpose is to find growth and meaning. However, for some, questions such as “what is the meaning of life” are oftentimes met with no real answers. Having no answer does not mean that there is not one. However, it can seem that way and cause people to believe that if they cannot think of an answer, then surely life is meaningless. Individuals who cannot seem to find meaning to life, may lack tangible long-term goals and settle for short-term satisfaction. This is not to say that people who struggle with these questions will start doing drugs. Nevertheless, it is possible it is harder for someone already struggling with addiction to find help or stop. 

existential loneliness

Existential Crises and Substance Abuse

Individuals who suffer from depression are at a higher risk of experiencing addiction and vice versa. When combined, it is referred to as a dual diagnosis or co-occurring disorder. Someone struggling with questions about life might feel an increase in existential loneliness. People suffering from various mental health condition may turn to substances to manage their emotions or symptoms. According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2018), 9.2 million American adults experienced both a mental health disorder and substance use disorders at the same time.

existential loneliness

How to treat a co-occuring disorder

Treating a co-occuring disorder requires attention to both issues and their respective causes. You cannot treat just the depression and expect the addiction to stop. Even if the depression may have caused the addiction in the first place. However, drug treatment has proven to significantly reduce drug use and criminal activity. It can make a major impact in someone’s life. Treating a co-occuring disorder usually involves four to six steps depending on the program. Every program will also be tailored and specific to the needs and symptoms of the patient. Though, there are some general steps all patients will need to take.

Detox

For many patients, detox is an important process to help heal the body. This process sometimes involves small doses of medication to safely manage withdrawal symptoms. This process can take about a week or longer depending on how well the patient responds to treatment.

Rehabilitation

 Inpatient rehab will help provide 24/7 support and care for individuals suffering from mental illness and substance abuse. Providing supervision in a dedicated space can help prevent the continued use of illicit drugs.

Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy is a major component to treating co-occurring disorders. It focuses on the mental aspect of what may have caused the disorder. One form of therapy is cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). CBT helps determine the underlying causes behind the mental illness, rather than just trying to manage its symptoms. It helps patients avoid negative thinking traps such as feelings of existential loneliness.

Support Groups

Support groups allow patients to feel as if they are a part of a larger, collective effort. They do so by engaging in conversation and activities with fellow patients. It helps them realize that they are not alone and that success is possible. 

It is important to realize that addiction is considered to be a chronic illness. Further, it falls under the same category as other chronic illnesses in terms of relapse rates. Diabetes, hypertension and asthma all share similar relapse rates as addiction. While relapse is common, it is also not a guarantee. However, recovery is a life-long process.

existential loneliness

Treatment

Dealing with addiction is never easy, especially in combination with mental health issues. Again, not every person dealing with existential loneliness turns to substances to cope. However, it is a possibility that many will deal with those questions and deal with substance use and abuse. It can be a complicated matter which may require professional help in order to successfully diagnose and treat. We always recommend getting professional help in order to increase your chances of life-long recovery. If you or a loved one is struggling with addiction, please contact us today to start the journey to recovery.