Tag Archives: Drug Detox

Lyrica Withdrawal

Lyrica, or pregabalin, is a prescription drug for neuropathic pain and seizures. However, it is also known to be addictive. It is possible for it contribute to destructive habits, serious depression, and suicidal thoughts. With long-term misuse or abuse, withdrawal is a real possibility. Lyrica withdrawal can be dangerous and uncomfortable if done alone. It is always best to stop use under medical supervision or to seek treatment for help in dealing with withdrawal.

What is Lyrica?

Pregabalin works by binding to the alpha 2 delta site in the central nervous system (CNS). This calms down nerves and creates pain relief for those suffering neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is caused by damaged nerve endings, which can be caused by other diseases such as diabetes, shingles, or fibromyalgia. Lyrica can also be a useful medication for stopping or preventing focal seizures. While it is a useful drug in some situations, Lyrica potentially includes a host of different side effects such as: 

  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Dry mouth
  • Constipation
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Weight gain
  • Blurred vision
  • Unusual bruising
  • Unsteadiness
  • Confusion
  • Muscle pain 
  • Swelling extremities 
  • Kidney issues 
  • Depression
  • Suicidal thoughts 
  • Anxiety

lyrica side effects

Lyrica Addiction

Lyrica addiction is uncommon, but it is possible for it to occur. Its negative effects have become more prevalent in recent years as prescriptions for it become more frequent. In the United States alone, over 64 million prescriptions were written for Lyrica (or some form of pregabalin) in 2016 alone. Given the high frequency of prescriptions, it is no wonder that the deaths associated with it have risen as well. 

It is possible to experience addiction when it is taken in high enough doses. Misusing it can provide a euphoric feeling and can even create feelings of dissociation in some individuals. Any drug or substance that creates feelings of euphoria has the potential for dependence and addiction. It is the ‘high’ most drugs offer which keep individuals coming back. This is especially true for people with pre-existing mental health conditions, since they may seek out experiences which can help them escape negative thoughts and feelings. 

Lyrica and depression

There are links between Lyrica, depression, and suicide. According to a study conducted by the University of Oxford looked at nearly 200,000 cases of individuals who used pregabalin between the years of 2006 to 2013 and found that 5.2% (over 10,000 people) were treated for suicidal behavior or died from suicide. A further 8.9% experienced overdoses and 6.3% were involved in serious car accidents. The study found that those using pregabalin were 26% more likely to experience suicidal behavior and 24% were likely to experience an overdose. 

lyrica side effects

The recent increase in pregabalin-related deaths and injuries became so severe that the United Kingdom reclassified the drug as a Class C Drug. This made it illegal to own or possess any amount of the drug, sell the drug, or to import it. The United States Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) considers the drug to be a Schedule 5 controlled substance. This means it is recognized as a drug with a lower potential for abuse but can still cause harm.

Lyrica Withdrawal

Abruptly stopping Lyrica is potentially dangerous to your health. With addiction or even dependence, care is necessary in order to avoid painful withdrawal symptoms. What is a withdrawal? Simply put, it is your body’s reaction to learning to cope without a constant supply of a stimulus. If you have been taking Lyrica for a number of years and suddenly stop, your body may struggle while learning how to survive without it. 

Withdrawals are often incredibly painful and in some cases cause death or require hospitalization. The withdrawal symptoms for Lyrica are similar to that of alcohol and benzodiazepines. However, the severity depends on length of drug usage, the dosage, and the user’s history of abuse with other drugs.

Lyrica withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Headaches
  • Anxiety
  • Confusion
  • Depression
  • Sweating
  • Rapid heart beats
  • Seizures
  • Insomnia
  • Cravings 
  • Mood swings
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea

lyrica withdrawal symptoms

It is possible for these symptoms to occur individually, or all at once. They typically begin 1-2 days after someone stops using Lyrica. The most at-risk patients are those who depend on the drug for anti-seizure medication. This danger is why supervision from medical and mental health professionals is always necessary for quitting Lyrica.

withdrawal is your body's reaction to learning to cope without a constant supply of a stimulus

How long does Lyrica stay in your system?

It is rare for employers or medical providers to test for Lyrica. However, it is still detectable in the body. How long it will stay in your system depends on various factors. Age, gender, genetic, metabolism, body-fat composition, and weight all play a role in determining how long the drug stays in someone’s system. 

Via urine test, it is possible to detect Lyrica  up to 6 days after ingestion, 2 days with a blood and saliva test and up to 6 months with a hair follicle test. Lyrica’s half-life is approximately 6 hours. A substance’s half-life indicates how long it takes for the ingested amount to reduce to half of its original size. In other words, if you ingest 10mg of Lyrica, it takes 6 hours for the drug to reduce to 5mg.

Getting help 

Deciding to seek help is a crucial step on the road to full recovery. Getting clean takes more than “willpower” –  it requires long-term effort and most of all, real support. Since addiction is so complex, it’s important to reach out for meaningful help. If you or a loved one are struggling with addiction, please contact us today to begin your journey to sobriety.

Signs of Cocaine Use

First and Foremost: What is Cocaine?

Cocaine is classified as a stimulant, and is one of the few non-synthetic drugs still widely abused in the US. Manufacturers refine the chemical cocaine hydrochloride found in the coca plant to create cocaine. In its “pure” form, cocaine looks like a fine, white powder. It can be smoked, snorted, injected, or taken orally. While the drug maintains a notorious status as an illegal substance, doctors sometimes prescribe cocaine for local anesthesia in surgeries. The drug can cause a wide variety of  short and long-term physical and mental effects. However, if you think someone you know may be abusing it, there are several signs of cocaine use to look out for.

 

How Does Cocaine Affect People?

A euphoric rush is the driving factor that usually leads people to abuse cocaine. Inside the body, cocaine stops the brain from absorbing dopamine, causing a surplus. This surplus causes the euphoric “high” attributed to cocaine. Physical manifestations of cocaine include an increased heart rate, increased breathing due to a higher demand for oxygen, and cool/clammy skin. Blood clotting, a rise in body temperature, tremors, and the inability to sweat can also occur. Less obvious, and sometimes psychological effects of cocaine can also present themselves. These include:

  • Intense thirst
  • Chest pain
  • Nausea
  • Headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Paranoia, vertigo
  • Various forms of psychosis

Signs of Cocaine UseLong-term use of cocaine can also have devastating effects on both body and mind, from damaged nasal tissue from snorting, to an increase in heart complications. Smoking crack cocaine can lead to similar complications for the lungs, such as cancer or a weaker immune system. Psychological complications can also develop. The brains of regular cocaine users brains eventually learn to expect the drug, and they develop a dependence on it. As an individual becomes addicted to cocaine, they need more of the drug to sustain the same feeling, and their focus fades from anything besides getting more of the drug. This can cause every part of their physical, personal, and work life to gradually deteriorate. It also increases the chances of a fatal overdose. 

 

What Are the Signs of Cocaine Use and Abuse?

As cocaine users become more and more dependent on the drug, it follows that their relationships can deteriorate.  Problems with their work life and finances may also manifest. When a person becomes so addicted to cocaine that a main goal in life is obtaining more of the drug, it leaves little time for anything else, whether that be a marriage, a relationship, or a job. Everyone around a person suffering from addiction also experiences repercussions of that person’s addiction.

Signs of Cocaine UseSometimes that effect can be severe. The children of someone with a cocaine use disorder, for instance, can be seriously negatively affected on a number of fronts. Developing embryos in a pregnant mother can be dangerously affected by cocaine use, including premature birth, spontaneous miscarriage, high blood pressure, or difficult delivery. Surprisingly, even a father’s cocaine use can negatively impact a developing fetus. A study found that male offspring of rats whose fathers had been given cocaine exhibited severe memory loss issues as well as learning disabilities. Granted, this study was conducted on rats, but the genetic makeup of rats and effects of cocaine on rats is strikingly similar to that of humans. With that in mind, there is a significant chance that the same effects can manifest in humans.

The impact of a cocaine addiction affects more than just children and family life, though. Employers are less likely to hire an individual who has a record of addiction, making it difficult to maintain a steady income. One article explores how people who suffer from addiction often have a lack of interpersonal skills, pointing out how an addiction damages one’s social potential. These factors can all put strain on a person suffering from addiction, as well as strain on the people around them.

 

How Can I Tell If A Loved One Is Using Cocaine?

Cocaine abuse hurts more than just the person using it. Not only can it destroy someone’s health and relationships, it can take a toll on everyone in their life. If you notice signs of cocaine use in someone you know, it is important to try to help them find a path to recovery. Here are some of the most prominent clues that a person may be abusing cocaine:

Cocaine Side Effects

Bipolarity

Extreme mood swings manifest when a person’s cocaine high disappears. effect of cocaine will have an individual expressing positive, high energy movements and communication. Then, as the drug wears off, those characteristics will abruptly stop or even reverse.

 

Financial problems

These stem as a result of a severe addiction. When a person becomes so invested in cocaine that nothing else matters, they can quickly begin struggling to properly manage their money.

 

Anxiety, Paranoia, or Psychosis

Mental health problems all stem directly from cocaine’s effect on the brain. Since the drug interferes with the user’s psychology, mental health problems like paranoia, anxiety, or other types of psychosis can develop.

 

Exhibiting Cocaine Withdrawal Symptoms

Symptoms can manifest very quickly, especially in a person who has developed a strong dependence on the drug. Physical symptoms of a cocaine withdrawal may not be obvious. However, fatigue, muscle spasms, lack of pleasure, irritability, and sleepiness are all common psychological symptoms.

Cocaine Withdrawal

What Should I Do if I Notice Signs of Cocaine Use?

If you see clues that someone in your life may be abusing cocaine, it makes sense to be concerned. The repercussions of a cocaine addiction are serious, and have a large sphere of influence. Getting help is the first step back to sobriety. Overcoming addiction is difficult, and getting back on track is tough, but doesn’t need to be faced alone. If you or a loved one is suffering from an addiction, contact us today so our professional and compassionate team can help you heal and recover – for life.

Baclofen Withdrawal

Baclofen is an antispasmodic medicine, which means it treats muscle spasms and twitches by relaxing the body’s muscles. When taken as directed by a doctor, it can be an effective treatment for symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis, spinal injuries, and even alcohol detox. On its own, it is not a particularly addictive drug. However, mixing it with other drugs, such as marijuana, alcohol, or opioids, can increase the “high” it causes, making Baclofen potentially addictive. When someone is dependent on baclofen, stopping suddenly can cause serious withdrawal symptoms – sometimes the same symptoms it is intended to treat. 

What is Baclofen?

Baclofen works by reducing the communication between muscles and the central nervous system. This makes stiffness and spasms less likely. Doctors usually prescribe Baclofen to treat patients with medical conditions that cause these symptoms, such as multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injuries. While more medical proof is needed, one study  showed that baclofen can also help with alcohol addiction by reducing or even eliminating cravings.  People usually take it in tablet form, and medical professionals may sometimes administer it by injecting it into a patient’s spinal fluid. Patients may also apply it to the skin as a cream or liquid. Baclofen’s side effects are generally mild:

  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Headaches
  • Trouble Sleeping
  • Nausea

Baclofen WithdrawalThere are no specific drugs that are prescribed with Baclofen, but there are several that should be avoided while taking it. Codeine, fentanyl, and morphine all have major interactions with Baclofen. Each of these drugs combined with Baclofen have similar side effects, the worst of which include trouble breathing, coma, and death. When combining baclofen with alcohol, someone may experience dizziness, drowsiness, or difficulty concentrating. Some people may even have trouble thinking or making clear-headed decisions. If you are taking baclofen, you should avoid operating machinery or driving until you know how it affects you, and do not combine it with other drugs without doctor supervision.

Is Baclofen Addictive?

Most people who abuse baclofen don’t do so intentionally at first. Someone may begin taking more than their directed dose thinking that more is better. People also sometimes mix it with other drugs without knowing the possible interactions and start down a dangerous path. Doctors commonly prescribe the use of Baclofen to treat withdrawal symptoms of other addictive substances, but Baclofen itself can become addictive. This means it can cause its own set of withdrawal symptoms. Some people abuse baclofen on its own (though this is rare), and abuse can develop into addiction. In one case, a user experienced feelings of well-being and pleasure for no apparent reason, as well as a craving for Baclofen. However, even a small decrease in dosage caused the patient to experience withdrawal symptoms.Baclofen Withdrawal

Baclofen Withdrawal

Baclofen withdrawal begins immediately after someone stops taking the drug, and the symptoms are sometimes severe. This usually happens when someone quits “cold turkey” – going from a full, regular dosage to nothing at all. However, withdrawal symptoms can also appear when a patient simply decreases their usual dose.  Since dependence is possible even in small doses, it is important to start and stop taking baclofen gradually.  Consult a medical professional if you think you should stop taking Baclofen or if it isn’t working for you. Some of the most common baclofen withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Agitation/Irritability
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Confusion

However, quitting baclofen can also cause more serious symptoms:

  • Hallucinations
  • Seizures
  • Delusions
  • Psychosis

These are more likely to occur if someone has been abusing baclofen along with alcohol or other drugs. This is where medically-supervised detox can be important and even life-saving.Baclofen Withdrawal

Overcoming Baclofen Withdrawal

Baclofen withdrawal symptoms are serious, and can occur very quickly, sometimes appearing as soon as 48 hours after someone stops taking the medication. Depending on withdrawal severity, some people may need medical attention. Because many people often don’t realize withdrawal can occur while taking Baclofen, they may simply stop taking it altogether, and not realize the consequences. It’s important to remember the seriousness of baclofen withdrawal and speak to your doctor if you want or plan to stop taking baclofen. 

The Bottom Line

While baclofen can be extremely beneficial when treating muscle spasms or alcohol detox, no one should take it casually. Baclofen can be abused by itself or with other drugs, sometimes leading to dangerous side effects. Dependence to baclofen also develops relatively quickly, and can occur even even if someone is taking a small amount. Since withdrawal symptoms can be so severe, caution is key when deciding how to stop taking Baclofen. If you think you or a loved one is struggling with Baclofen abuse, or any addiction, reach out for help. Contact us and we can help you on your journey to sobriety.

Withdrawal Symptoms And Opioid Detox Treatment Programs For Young Men


Opioid addiction has reached epidemic levels across the United States, disregarding social, economic, and racial lines and affecting communities of all sizes in every state. There have been several legislative actions in recent years aimed at curbing the number of overdose deaths and new addiction cases, but opioids continue to be the leading cause of accidental deaths in the United States.

Young men struggling with opioid addiction may not know where to turn for help, and there are a wide variety of treatment options available. However, it is essential to find a treatment solution that works for the individual and offers an individualized treatment plan and continuum of care.

Learn The Warning Signs Of Opioid Addiction

Friends and family can identify the warning signs of an opioid addiction with vigilance, but it’s important to remember that the social stigmas surrounding addiction and the shame and isolation drug abuse can create causes many young men to hide their habits, even from the people closest to them.

Top 5 Signs Of Opioid Addiction

There are many warning signs of opioid addiction, but some of the most common include:

  • Needing more pills before a prescription refill is possible. Many people develop opioid addictions because of legitimate medical issues like injuries or surgical procedures that entail opioid painkiller prescriptions. Opioids are powerfully addictive and even a few doses can spur an addiction; it is essential to keep tabs on a family member’s prescription consumption. If he starts running out of pills before a refill is available, this is likely a sign that he has been using too much and may have started abusing his prescription.
  • Switching from pills to street drugs. When prescription refills run out after addiction has taken hold, a young man with a blossoming opioid addiction will likely turn to the black market for more drugs. Prescription opioid pills are extremely expensive on the street, sometimes as much as $20 per pill, and heroin becomes an attractive alternative at this point, considering the average street cost of a single dose is about $5 or less.
  • Doctor shopping. Some people who develop prescription opioid painkiller addictions will start “doctor shopping,” or visiting multiple doctors in rapid succession for the same issue in the hope of securing multiple prescriptions which they fill at various pharmacies. Many states have started cracking down on this practice by implementing prescription drug monitoring systems in state pharmacies and penalizing doctors who negligently prescribe opioids to their patients.
  • Malnourishment. Opioid addiction can cause a person to neglect basic needs like proper diet and hydration. A person suffering from opioid addiction may appear thin, sickly, weak, or generally unwell despite protesting that he or she feels fine. When opioid addiction reaches critical levels, a person will invariably start neglecting basic needs in pursuit of more drugs.
  • Withdrawal symptoms. Opioids can cause powerful withdrawal symptoms that are so excruciatingly painful and unpleasant the person can do nothing but think of obtaining more drugs to stop the discomfort. When a person starts displaying the typical signs of opioid withdrawal it is time to start looking for treatment options.

Dangers Of Opioid Detox

Some people mistakenly believe they can go “cold turkey” and drop an opioid addiction as they would drop cigarettes. Unfortunately, self-detox is not only difficult but also very dangerous, and the danger increases the longer the addiction persists. It may be possible to overcome addictive urges and cravings in the early stages of an addiction, but full-blown opioid addiction demands professional treatment in a safe environment.

Medically Assisted Opioid Detox

A proper opioid detox treatment for young men should include medical assistance and nutritional support during the detox process. As the last dose of drugs leaves a person’s system the withdrawal symptoms can manifest with severe intensity. Some of those symptoms can include high fever, organ failure, rapid heart rate, and hallucinations that can be dangerous without medical assistance.

The Value Of Sex-Specific Treatment Options

Finding an acceptable drug detox program is just one step in the recovery process. Reflections Rehab offers men’s-only substance abuse treatment because we understand the value of sex-specific treatment centers. A men’s-only center naturally encourages building trust among peers, working together, and sharing experiences to find common ground and heal together by eliminating many common social distractions found in co-ed recovery programs. Although many co-ed programs are highly successful, men and women inherently change their behaviors around members of the opposite sex, and sometimes these dynamics can interfere with treatment.

Reflections Rehab’s Men’s-Only Substance Abuse Treatment Program

The Reflections Rehab treatment experience revolves around taking care of the whole person, not just the symptoms of addiction but the underlying causes as well. Our program entails building trust, maintaining a healthy body and mind, and exploring the reasons behind addiction to develop better coping skills for the future.

Any drug treatment program should begin with medically assisted detox, especially for opioid addiction. Without appropriate medical attention, a person suffering from opioid withdrawal symptoms could face life-threatening symptoms or simply start using again to avoid withdrawal.

Our program starts with medically assisted opioid detox, followed by a comprehensive treatment plan that addresses each patient’s individual needs and risk factors. Adventure therapy and exploring the outdoors are at the forefront of our therapeutic offerings; you will not find a typical clinical rehab experience at Reflections Rehab. We believe in building confidence, strengthening the body, and teaching new coping skills for a stronger defense against relapse and the most holistic recovery experience possible for every patient.